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Deadlock over deadlocks
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CJH
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25/10/2018 - 3:31 pm
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Reference on our Fire Safety Schedule relating to strata unit/lot entry doors to standard of performance is: AS 1905.1-2005 BCA C3.8, C3.11 . The doors get the tick from the inspecting entity – but repeatedly year after year the locks are identified for replacement – under the provisions of the aforementioned standard. I cant seem to find aught on what standards required for locks.

The existing locks in almost all units are the old deadlocks, for which we have a procedure that owners/residents leave them in latched position when they are in residence, allowing for a one-hand exit in event of fire. These original locks then provide a solid lock when owners/residents are not in residence.

Since the most likely adverse event is theft/robbery, a lock that cannot be easily forced is advisable. For this reason owners do not want to change their original locks.

Is it absolutely compulsory that these locks be changed? They were compliant at the time of original certification for occupancy to council and I cannot find any change or reference in the standards to having to change the locks or meet later BCA standards.

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spmanager
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31/10/2018 - 11:24 am
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Sorry to tell you but if the fire inspector says change. Then you change the locks. Go to a reliable locksmith and they can put in replacement locks that are also very safe for the residents. I would contact NSW Fire Brigade and they are more than willing to tell you what locks you should have.

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Not An Apartment
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05/11/2018 - 2:42 pm
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I’m unclear with your post as to why your deadlocks are considered unsuitable, but here’s my experience: 

I had a double deadlock installed when I first moved in; the deadlock was fine for many years but then got hard to close from outside without slamming hard enough to bring the building down, so I called a locksmith to replace it, which he did.

I immediately noticed a difference:  old lock – it’s double locked and coming in carrying a load of stuff I inadvertently left the keys in the lock outside, and the door slams closed behind.  Keys outside; me inside, door locked. I had to hunt around to find my spare keys to unlock door and get keys from outside, so all okay.

The new lock, same situation BUT this time:  unlocking the door from the outside also un-deadlocks the lock from the inside, so no need to find spares, just open door and retrieve keys. It’s still locked from the outside, but not inside.  The locksmith said that was how the newer deadlocks worked to avoid people locking themselves in.

Sometime along the way, I decided the best place to keep my keys when home,  was, in the lock inside, which also allowed me to keep it deadlocked, but no delay finding keys if someone shouts “fire”. The only time I lose my keys now is if I don’t put them straight into the lock when stepping in.

Maybe that is applicable in this situation?

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spmanager
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06/11/2018 - 9:40 am
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the main reason locks do not comply is because the lock could hold the door open. If you have a lock that you could use so that the door will not close then it needs replacing.  Typically its the type of dead lock that has pins that drop down into slots, you can lock the pins down when the door is open and the door will then not close.

Fire Doors must only be fitted with door hardware fire rated in accordance with AS1905.1

Fire Door locks must be self-latching and are not permitted to have a hold open feature. 

Remember the lock is to allow the door to close behind you when you need to get away from a fire.

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