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Access to common property ...
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dwa
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01/11/2018 - 12:31 pm
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Hi,

I’m seeking clarification around restriction of access to common property such as switchboard cabinets.

What are owners rights regarding such access? 

My understanding is that common property is something I have access to as a matter of course, simply by owning a lot, and that it cannot be prevented.

If it’s a question of (perception of) safety, I could easily have a qualified agent access cabinets for me, which comes back to general access.

Thanks in advance,

DWA.

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JimmyT
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01/11/2018 - 5:41 pm
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There is a distinction between common property and communal property.  For instance, your balcony is technically common property – in terms of who has responsibility for its maintenance – but that doesn’t mean every other owner is permitted to access it.

Even communal property like a swimming pool may be subject to restrictions on the hours you can use it. And common property areas such as the roof may have a complete ban on owners’ access.

The same applies to utilities – unless you have a legitimate reason for requiring access to fuse boxes or powerboards, then they should be off limits to most owners.  Why?  Because of potential dangers to owners and potential detriment to the rest of the scheme if anyone and everyone can go in there and start messing around.

That said, if you have a legitimate reason for requiring access, then the strata committee (or whatever it’s called in WA) should be able to allow it, subject to reasonable restrictions.

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Andy
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16/11/2018 - 1:15 pm
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All valid points however just like knowing where access to the water mains is for an emergency, Ive always insisted in having access to my electrical fuse box even when I rented years ago. 

Needing to call a building manager or strata manager to open a door while someone is being electrocuted is not something I would want to.

There was the same debate in our building about who should have access. An electronic key system is now in place which registers who enters the meter room and when they enter it. 

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