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  • #50222
    Avatarfruitzebra
    Flatchatter
    Chat-starter

    I purchased a ground floor unit late last year. It is a two-floor building. After we moved in, we found that there are constant noises from upstairs, footsteps, chair/table moving, activities in the kitchen, bedroom doors openning and closing, etc. The tenants upstairs don’t seem to do anything crazy. It looks like a flooring issue to us. I learned from the tenants that the owner upstairs installed cheap thin carpets 2 years ago. So I complained to the strata manager. After a month or two, the manager managed to obtain a carpet replacement certificate from the agent that manages the property, showing that they complied with rules. And no further action was taken. A few days ago, I told the strata manager that I want to take the matter to NCAT. So the strata manager arranged their property manager and the carpet installer to come to investigate the issue. We had some email communications to arrange a date. What the property manager and the carpet installer want to do is to pull up the carpet to show us what type of underlay that they use.

    My questions are:
    1. Is this kind of simplistic “investigation” enough?
    2. Should we hire an acoustic engineer to investigate this matter?
    3. If we hire an acoustic engineer, who should pay the acoustic engineer? I? The owner upstairs? Or the strata?

    I would really appreciate some suggestions. Thanks in advance.

Viewing 8 replies - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #50523
    Jimmy-TJimmy-T
    Keymaster

    It may be “the standard” but the critical issue is whether or not it does the job and in your case it clearly doesn’t, at least, not to your satisfaction.

    There are so many other issues in the noise insulation and so many variables, such as the thickness of the slab and the density of the concrete pour, that using the thickness of the insulation and carpet as the only metric is frankly ridiculous.

    The main issue is noise transmission allied to your legal right to the peaceful enjoyment of your lot.  If the former compromises the latter, minimum building standards are almost irrelevant.

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago by .
    #50509
    Avatarfruitzebra
    Flatchatter
    Chat-starter

    The thickness of their carpet underlay is 7mm. It was installed in 2018. They said it’s the standard in Australia. Is that right?

    #50508
    Avatarfruitzebra
    Flatchatter
    Chat-starter

    I support all the comments above, but I do wonder about one thing. Did you move into your flat from a free-standing house, as many downsizers do? Noise levels in medium density are inevitably not the same as on your old quarter-acre block.

    No. I had lived in apartments most of the time. I’ve never experienced this before.

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago by .
    #50507
    Avatarfruitzebra
    Flatchatter
    Chat-starter

    Yes, I am in Sydney. It will be great if you could recommend one. Thanks!

    #50488
    Avatarbrianpr
    Flatchatter

    I support all the comments above, but I do wonder about one thing. Did you move into your flat from a free-standing house, as many downsizers do? Noise levels in medium density are inevitably not the same as on your old quarter-acre block.

    #50440
    AvatarRoof
    Flatchatter

    Hi, if you’re in Sydney I can recommend an acoustic engineer in North St Marys (think they’ve moved from Drummoyne) and I sympathise.  The building standard of 62dB is woefully inadequate in most buildings (carpet with good underlay is rated at 39dB).  It might be a good idea in the first instance to visit your neighbours but if they’re anything like the herd of elephants (5 in total) above me…..  Sadly my neighbours are intimidating bullies and the children are being brought up the same.  Good luck

    #50227
    Avatarfruitzebra
    Flatchatter
    Chat-starter

    Thanks very much for your answers, kaindub.

    I’m all new to this. Just wondering if there are good acoustic engineers anyone can recommend in Sydney? What would be the cost for a visit like this?

    #50225
    Avatarkaindub
    Flatchatter

    1 No

    2 Yes

    3 You initially.

    You are entitled to quite enjoyment of your lot. That you are not getting it is a serious matter. If you can’t get a resolution with the upstairs owner, then certainly take it to NCAT.

    In order to prove your case you need expert witnesses. The carpet layer nor the SM are not experts in noise. You need to hire the expert, but the cost can be recovered when you win the case.

    The legal argument revolves around the fact that you can’t get quite enjoyment, not what type of underlay is installed.

    Additionally keep a diary noting when the noise occurs and take recordings of the noise.

    Good luck

Viewing 8 replies - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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