This topic contains 7 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Sir Humphrey 3 weeks, 4 days ago.

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  • #37236
    Sir Humphrey
    Sir Humphrey
    Strataguru

    Here is an article on installation of electric vehicle charging in an NSW block.
    https://thedriven.io/2019/04/29/lane-cove-apartment-block-sets-australian-record-for-electric-chargers
    It is implied that their 7kW charging outlets are part of a networked smart system that would dial back charging to a slower rate, more like an ordinary power point (240V at 10A is 2.4kW), if many cars are plugged in at once. This avoids exceeding the maximum capacity of the building or site but allows charging to speed up from less than 2kW in steps to 7kW as fewer cars are charging.
    This is not inexpensive to set up but results in entirely adequate charging rates and it is nowhere near as expensive as rapid DC chargers such as one might have along a highway, which might not even work on the building’s supply capacity and could be a nuisance if someone parking in the one charging spot can’t be found.
    The question I would have is: This system sounds like it has been set up by a provider who might expect to manage the system for years into the future, handling billing and maintenance for the OC. In the ACT, the Unit Titles (Management) Act prevents an OC from contracting with a service provider for more than 3 years. Is this the same in NSW?

    • This topic was modified 3 weeks, 5 days ago by Jimmy-T.
    #37237
    Sir Humphrey
    Sir Humphrey
    Strataguru
    Chat-starter

    PS. Here is a good explanation of a smart charge rate management system:

    https://www.evse.com.au/blog/evchargerloadmanagement/

    #37239
    Jimmy-T
    Jimmy-T
    Keymaster

    Sir Humphrey wrote:

    The question I would have is: This system sounds like it has been set up by a provider who might expect to manage the system for years into the future, handling billing and maintenance for the OC. In the ACT, the Unit Titles (Management) Act prevents an OC from contracting with a service provider for more than 3 years. Is this the same in NSW?

    I think strata management agents’ contracts are the only ones limited to three years in NSW.  Some embedded infrastructure agreements are being signed for 99 years, but consumer protections in NSW allow lot owners to opt out of embedded energy agreements, so that could complicate things.

    #37262
    Avatar
    Kenuppa
    Flatchatter

    What should we be doing as a Strata Committee to prepare for the inevitability of an owner or tenant requesting a charging facility for an electric vehicle?  (Our building is a mix of Commercial and Residential.)

    Should we be preparing a By Law or a guideline for EV charging for our upcoming AGM?  If so are there samples available?

    Could we establish a multiple charging station, as shown in the above link to EVSE and position it on the Common Property car park? (It could then be available to the public.)

    Or do we just do nothing and wait until an owner arrives with a new EV and demands a 7kW outlet for charging, and deal with it using our existing By Laws?

    A multiple charging station on the Common Property may be problematic as owners, occupants and their invitees are not permitted to park or allow a vehicle to stand on Common Property, without the Body Corporate’s written approval.

     

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by Jimmy-T.
    #37264
    Sir Humphrey
    Sir Humphrey
    Strataguru
    Chat-starter

    The place to start, especially if you are in NSW, is to download and read through the WattBlock report (<span lang=”EN-GB”>https://www.wattblock.com/recharge.html)</span>. It has everything from assessing the electrical supply capacity of the building to work out what sorts of system you could have and might like to have through to model by-laws for different circumstances.

    There is a lot to consider. I would be very happy to have a chat by phone to talk through some of the basics and options, which might be easier than diving in at the deep end. For a start, 7kW is not necessarily always possible or necessary. Send me personal message and we could work out a time to talk.

    #37266
    Jimmy-T
    Jimmy-T
    Keymaster

    Kenuppa wrote:

    A multiple charging station on the Common Property may be problematic as owners, occupants and their invitees are not permitted to park or allow a vehicle to stand on Common Property, without the Body Corporate’s written approval.

    So you give them written approval to park there for as long as it takes to charge their vehicles (and no longer).

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by Jimmy-T.
    #37269
    Sir Humphrey
    Sir Humphrey
    Strataguru
    Chat-starter

    So you give them written approval to park there for as long as it takes to charge their vehicles (and no longer).

    If a resident is dependent on the charger for their own car, they would prefer to charge where they routinely park. That way, they could plug in before going to bed and not have to get up at 3AM to move the car. If at all possible, I would strongly encourage charging to be available where people routinely park.

    However, an option for charging in other locations that would encourage people to stay no longer than necessary is to charge by the hour rather than by the kilowatt-hour. Charging outlets such as those provided by EVSE (an unfortunate company name because certain types of charging outlets are EVSEs. EVSE, the company, supplies EVSEs, the equipment, as well as other sorts of EV-associated services and equipment) can be configured for billing by hour or by kWh, ie by time spent connected or by energy taken.

    #37272
    Sir Humphrey
    Sir Humphrey
    Strataguru
    Chat-starter

    Answering my own question from above. I talked to a guy from EVSE. Their system and software is flexible and open source so an OC would not be locked in forever or a very long time. They would set you up and you would engage them for 3 years but you are not obliged for longer. So, an OC in the ACT could engage them to set up EV charging and they would not fall foul of the ACT’s 3 year limit on service contracts.

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