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  • #43633
    AvatarRoland
    Flatchatter

    NSW strata in Canterbury Bankstown local council area. Small block. We have a long narrow driveway. Until very recently there were no concerns about this. Drivers respected privacy and safety. Recently we have a speeding resident clearly indifferent to the safety of others. The EC are discussing speed humps. Is there another solution? The do the standard by-laws offer any protection?  What can be done?

    #43658
    Jimmy-TJimmy-T
    Keymaster

    As the driveway is common property, you can set your own speed limit but then you also have to enforce it yourselves through by-laws and breach notices.  That raises the issue of how exactly you prove a resident was exceeding the speed limit.

    Speed bumps or chicanes may be the simplest solution … or you could quietly threaten the speeder that when you install the speed bumps, you will make sure everybody in the scheme knows why they are having to pay for them.

    I have had a quick look online for private speed cameras and can find nothing available in Australia (although that doesn’t mean there aren’t any).  However, how about this for a solution?  Install a security camera and paint two lines as far apart as you can on the section of driveway most used for speeding.

    You can then use security video to calculate the speed of vehicles and hit them with Notices to Comply.

    For instance, if the markers are 20 metres apart and the driver crosses them in less than one second (as timed by the camera) then they are travelling at more than 50 kph [see replies below].

    But first you will need a by-law in place that set the speed limits at a reasonable level (5 to 10 kph?) so you can then have something to enforce.  Or you could just talk to the driver and say, this is what we are going to have to do unless you stop being a dickhead.

    As far as standard by-laws go, unless your DA specifies the maximum speed on the driveway – in which case they would be breaching planning law, meaning they are breaching the relevant by-law – you need to set your own.

    Either way, it’s a matter of proving it, and I think for that the security camera and marker lines may be the best way to go … although your fellow Flatchatters may have a better idea.

     

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by .
    #43837
    AvatarAndy
    Flatchatter

    If you go with a Speed bump make sure it’s firmly and tightly fixed to the ground. Those metal and plastic speedbumps can make an almighty clanging or thumping noise when there is any movement.

    #44450
    Avatarchesswood
    Flatchatter

    Jimmy, 20 metres in one second is 36 km/h.

    #44452
    Avatarchesswood
    Flatchatter

    sorry, try 72 km/h. 40 km/h is just over 11 metres/second.

    #44477
    Jimmy-TJimmy-T
    Keymaster

    Glad to see someone has as much trouble with arithmetic as I clearly do.

    This does raise the question of what is a reasonable speed on a driveway.  Inside our car park the limit is 5kph, a speed I and (it seems) other residents find difficult to maintain.  A couple of steep access slopes make it almost impossible in anything faster than a farm tractor.

    This website suggests 10 kph, which is not just reasonable but achievable.  There’s no point in having limits that people can’t  easily observe and maintain.

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