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  • #42856
    Roland
    Flatchatter

    How can we stop this? The Canterbury Bankstown Council rangers advised that unless they can see a person putting food out or feeding them they cannot take any action. Compounding the problem is that NSW law allows cats to “roam”.  Strata have a sign up saying no cats, but my guess is that nothing strata can do will deter this individual owner. Without going into it, the committee is slowly getting on top of cleaning up a very dilapidated and dirty common area. We recently got rid of a very large tree which was home to roosting ibis above clothes line area. Now we are onto the next “wildlife” issue.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
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  • #55894
    Jimmy-T
    Keymaster

    Well, well, well! The city of Chicago has just released 1000 neutered, vaccinated and microchipped feral cats on to its streets, in an effort to deal with major league rat infestation, according to this story.

    And here’s the kicker – the cats don’t need to be hungry to be effective.  Just having them around scares the rats away.  Apparently these untamable street cats faced years in compounds or euthenasia until somebody had the brilliant idea of releasing “working cats”.

    Just as well our cities don’t have rat problems … oh, wait a minute!!!

    A line in the Crooked Media “What A Day” newsletter that the city is now rounding up coyotes in case of a future cat infestation was a joke, OK?

    #55884
    Jimmy-T
    Keymaster

    The cat-feeder is not a resident. A gang of strangers organized over a private Facebook group to take turns dropping-off cat-food at pre-selected spots in several suburbs. They listen to nobody and are very aggressive.

    A “gang”? Really? Trust me, immoderate language undermines your argument.

    #55879
    Cathy
    Flatchatter

    The cat-feeder is not a resident. A gang of strangers organized over a private Facebook group to take turns dropping-off cat-food  at pre-selected spots in several suburbs. They listen to nobody and are very aggressive.

    #55816
    TrulEConcerned
    Flatchatter

    Given:

    1. As has been written, cats are great in the effort to control rodents;
    2. The council has clarified what is needed by them in order to take action;
    3. You are determined to rid your strata of cats given the constant cleaning costs; and
    4. It is had to tell if you’re anti cat or anti anyone treating the strata like an unregulated zoo.

    If I may suggest a compromise:

    Find a place that you would be happy where the cat(s) is (are) to be fed. This could be (a) in a distinct

    part of the common property away from most folks’ homes and cars or (b) you could suggest the feeding

    take place on the premises of the cats’ caterer. You could also require him to clean up every time. The cleaning up

    requirement could be managed through enacting a by law. If you really wanted to be sneaky, you could offer a place

    on the common property and ensure one of the existing security cameras is aimed at the feeding station.

    If you have no cameras in place, now’s the perfect time…

    #55791
    Cathy
    Flatchatter

    Council officers can issue fines.under sections under 145 and 145A Protection of the Environment (Operations) Act 1997 (NSW). section 145A(2) states that aggravation means circumstances in which the litter deposited by the alleged offender (a)  caused or contributed to appreciable danger or harm to any persons, animals, premises or property,

    Pests attracted by cat-food are an appreciable danger to people due to dangerous diseases transmitted by pests to people. The Cat Protection Society’s audit report admits this.

    The majority of cats and kittens coming to us are strays without access to clean water and food, so it is not surprising that we saw 201 cases of coccidia, 138 of campylobacter, 109 of giardia and 18 cases of salmonella (please note one cat can be a ‘case’ in multiple categories, eg have both giardia and campylobacter). Faecal screens also revealed 205 cases of roundworm, five cases of tapeworm, four cases of flatworm and 31 cases of hookworm.

    #55646
    scotlandx
    Strataguru

    I am not a big fan of cats, primarily because of the damage they do to wildlife if they are allowed to roam freely – it is estimated cats kill 1.7 billion native animals each year. I believe if someone wants to keep a cat it should be kept inside. There is also the issue of their waste – I have spent a fabulous day cleaning out piles of cat deposits left in our courtyard after a cat owner left. But that is a personal thing. Charity is also a personal thing – if people want to support a cat welfare charity, that’s their business.

    The issue here is an owner leaving out food for stray cats. We have a by-law that provides that food for animals cannot be left on the common property. That should deal with your problem.

    An owner or occupier of a lot must not feed an animal on common property or leave food, animal bowls or litter trays on the common property.

     

    #55632
    Jimmy-T
    Keymaster

    One person replied that he knew of no Government grant. A rat-feeder personally assured me that his charity was very well funded with large Government grants, tax breaks and public donations – all illegal.

    I am that person. So what’s illegal?  They get tax breaks because they are a charity clearly doing charitable works unlike, say, a private school, which is a business designed to turn out entitled pricks who come out thinking they should run the country (because they probably will).  Or a religion?

    Regarding the grants, if you take the Cat Protection Society of NSW, I was only aware of the state grant of $15,500 and I didn’t know about  the $257,000 Commonwealth grant. Big deal – a drop in their ocean.

    But if you want some facts (because that’s what we deal with here), have a look at their annual report for 2019-2020. They’ve been doing pretty tough through Covid, while their cats have been offering comfort and companionship to a lot of isolated people.

    And if you are really complaining about cats being on the street, why are you accusing a charity that gets them off the street of acting illegally?

    Admit it, you just don’t like cats.

    Enjoy your chillies.

     

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 2 days ago by .
    #55627
    Cathy
    Flatchatter

    Convince your strata committee to create a strata garden plan that repel stray cats / pests. It value-adds to units that can then be advertised as a premium clean pest-free environment.

    1. many varieties of beautiful red hot chillis + cayenne are superb for repelling stray cats. Absolutely no catnip because cats love it.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/growing-chili-pepper-plants.htm
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/growing-cayenne-peppers.htm
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/chili-pepper-companion-plants.htm
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/chili-peppers-not-hot.htm

    https://davidsuzuki.org/queen-of-green/keep-cats-garden/

    2. other beautiful plants repel cats. eg, The lawn can be replaced with lemongrass and citronella grass. With rosemary all around the perimeter.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/animals/cat-repellent.htm

    3. beautiful plants to repel insects.

    https://www.abc.net.au/gardening/factsheets/pest-management-plants/9427576
    https://www.treehugger.com/plants-that-repel-unwanted-insects-4864336

    Local Councils are full of politics that can be harnessed for proper results. Facts:

    1. The Mayor runs the Council: he hires and fires staff and orders them what to do or not do.

    2. The Mayor is one of many Councillor and elected by the other Councillors as their leader.

    3. If the Mayor refuses to direct the Council police (called Rangers) to fine rat-feeders (for aggravated littering under sections 45 and 45A Protection of the Environment (Operations) Act (NSW)), then contact ALL other Councillors to inform them of the Mayor’s mismanagement.

    4. Provide photographs of the cat-food + written records of the location, time and date (yeah tedious but necessary). You need evidence to convince the other Councillors.

    5. If anyone fell sick due to pests, persuade him/her to send their medical certificate to all the Councillors.

    Above all, do share your success stories on this web-site to encourage others to take firm, determined, and relentless organized actions against the pest plagues that endanger our health. May we all succeed together.

    One person replied that he knew of no Government grant. A rat-feeder personally assured me that his charity was very well funded with large Government grants, tax breaks and public donations – all illegal.

    #55586
    Jimmy-T
    Keymaster

    RAT-feeders (who believe they are feeding cats but in fact, creating a pest nuisance) are organized into a charitable society/ association. They receive significant taxation benefits, generous public donations and probably huge Government grants.

    We got our kittens from a charity that rescues street cats, desexes them, returns them to the “wild” (because they can’t be domesticated) then finds homes for their kittens.

    The cat charities that I know of survive mostly on charitable donations and other fun-raising efforts.  I don’t know of any “huge government grants”.

     

    #55495
    Cathy
    Flatchatter

    Every time I see cat-food on the pavement, I always see cockroaches, ants, flies, midges, slugs, centipedes, rats, mice, snails, ibis and ravens eating the cat-food. Very rarely do I see cats eating cat-food on the pavement. Further, cats who receive free food never bother to hunt rats or mice. Only starving cats hunt.

    The term “cat-feeders” is false, misleading and deceptive. I call these people RAT-feeders.

    RAT-feeders (who believe they are feeding cats but in fact, creating a pest nuisance) are organized into a charitable society/ association. They receive significant taxation benefits, generous public donations and probably huge Government grants.

    Creation of a PEST problem and spreading of dangerous diseases that pose a danger to public health. Therefore, their activities are a misuse of charitable funds. Their activities are not a charitable purpose.

    We should altogether complain to the NSW Premier and ACNC (Australia’s Charity Commissioner).

    Once Government funding is cut off, the charitable society/ association is deregistered, and its mischievous trustees are blacklisted (so they cannot set up another charitable society/ association). I believe this menace can be considerably reduced.

    The question is: WHAT is the name of the charitable society/ association whose members are abusing their privileges by harassing us, the general public ?

    #47321
    BONNIE L
    Flatchatter

    Hi,  A query re getting rid of a tree due to problem type birds, were other birdlife prevented from visiting this tree? Or perhaps the tree was damaged in an irretrievable way?   Was the local council asked for an opinion?  Some councils have special people specialising in environmental concerns.

    #47284
    Poida
    Flatchatter
    (from NSW)

    We have the same issue in Harris Park. Neighbour in the block opposite feeds a dozen stray cats (many look sickly, some with broken tail) and several unoccupied old houses in this suburb (awaiting knock-down for more flat blocks to come) provide great breeding grounds for each next generation of the poor things.

    Unfortunately he impact of cats is not limited to rats and includes native birds, possums, lizards etc.

    Parramatta Council, like others, are too short-sighted to intervene. A Trap/Neuter/Release program would stop the cycle but they’ll only rent you a trap and have each one killed if you deliver it (bit too extreme for me). I checked a bunch of local organisations but none have got money for TNR anymore.

    PS: I like cats, I’ve got a RSPCA rescued/neutered one but it will never see the outdoors. It’s irresponsible to let them roam and hopefully will be illegal nationwide soon (I think some local governments around the country have already done so?).

    It’s just a sad situation.

    #46926
    Jimmy-T
    Keymaster

    Cat deterrents?  I think they’re called dogs.

    But seriously the problem is the cat feeder.  A well-written and precise by-law, with breaches pursued rigorously,  and a well-positioned security camera, will eventually do the trick in a more humane way.

    #46909
    Banned
    Flatchatter

    Not sure what trespass there is?

    Aside from the bylaw, there are cat deterrents available such as electric fences, sprays and ultrasonic devices.
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    #46907
    Andy
    Flatchatter

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>I don’t see how a resident can be trespassing on common property. How many cats are there now?</p>
    The other night I found a stray dog on the Hume Hwy. I picked it up and took it to an animal shelter. Easy.

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