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  • #42856
    AvatarRoland
    Flatchatter

    How can we stop this? The Canterbury Bankstown Council rangers advised that unless they can see a person putting food out or feeding them they cannot take any action. Compounding the problem is that NSW law allows cats to “roam”.  Strata have a sign up saying no cats, but my guess is that nothing strata can do will deter this individual owner. Without going into it, the committee is slowly getting on top of cleaning up a very dilapidated and dirty common area. We recently got rid of a very large tree which was home to roosting ibis above clothes line area. Now we are onto the next “wildlife” issue.

    #42871
    Jimmy-TJimmy-T
    Keymaster

    You could contact a cat rescue charity and they will come and capture and neuter the cats (then release them).

    You could have a look at a by-law that doesn’t permit owners to behave in a way that attracts cats on to common property.

    But I find these posts a little troubling. You got rid of a large tree to get rid of ibis, now you want to get rid of cats.

    But, really, what’s the problem? Are the cats really a nuisance or do you just not like cats?

    Good luck with the rats when the cats are gone.

    #42887
    AvatarDavid Ng
    Flatchatter

    But, really, what’s the problem? Are the cats really a nuisance or do you just not like cats?

    Good luck with the rats when the cats are gone.

    Yes feral cats are a huge issue in some blocks. Our block, which is all ground level has to take several measures to repel feral cats. This includes using vinegar, citrus and other cat repelling items.

    Feral cats are noisy and destructive, damaging lawn and gardens. They seem to continuously and copiously copulate with their cacophonous cries and ceaseless caterwauling.  It means having to catnap between their conjugal catch ups. It is chaotic.

    Here in Victoria, our council provides traps that can be used to catch the cats. Once caught the council either euthanises them or passes them onto a shelter for rehoming.

    I love cats and my now deceased cat was a strictly indoor animal. It made for very good neighbourly relations.

     

    #42899
    AvatarAndy
    Flatchatter

    Perhaps the cats need to be fed as there are no more Ibis. Once the cats are gone someone will need to feed the rats. Once the rats are gone you will have a splendid batch of cockroaches….

    Sometimes you just need to take responsibility yourself if no one else will. Call those organisations today if you won’t or can’t catch the stray cats yourself to bring them yourself. Otherwise and unfortunately you may well have a dozen kittens to deal with also by the next GM. In 2 years you will have 50 feral cats irrespective of said resident feeding them or not.

    A radical idea is to get the current ones neutered and then adopted by residents of the building. After all it’s not the cats fault.

     

    #42943
    Avatarmagpie
    Flatchatter

    I agree with those who advise that you start dealing with the cats. I had a business in an inner city area of Melbourne years ago and the strays were multiplying fast when people began to feed them. There were first two then a dozen. I had to catch and transport the cats to the RSPCA. Your council will lend a humane trap to you and you can take the captured cats to the RSPCA where they will desex and find homes for them. (Please make a donation to the RSPCA if you do take cats to them.) You could also put pressure on the NSW government to change the cat roaming laws. Roaming cats do incredible harm to each other and to wildlife.

    #42954
    AvatarRoland
    Flatchatter
    Chat-starter

    Thanks you for your responses. It is very difficult to get stray cats collected. The RSPCA and NSW cat society won’t do it. Keep in mind that strays are not tagged, vaccinated etc. I have enquired and I have their negative responses. These type of organisations are about rehoming already owned animals that are already well cared for IMHO.

    The Canterbury Bankstown Council have been very helpful. As the real issue here is that cats are permitted to “roam” in NSW and the council animal welfare officer was able to explain that it would not be appropriate to catch and remove as we have no way of knowing if they actually “belong” to someone.

    As an aside, if these cats were nuisance unowned stays, the council do make available a trap so they can be captured and taken to the councils animal containment facility conveniently located 38kms away from the council area however the council website currently advises that the trap is unavailable  “Please note, there has been an outbreak of Feline Panleukopaenia virus in Sydney. As a result, Council has been forced to suspend the cat trap cage service”.

    So the council have taken it on as a health issue and advising that it is the availability of food (garbage) that attracts the cats and ibis. Their advice includes spraying citronella.

    I will propose a by-law at the upcoming AGM to ban feeding strays which (if approved) will give some strength to the notes sent around by strata.

     

     

     

    #46881
    AvatarRoland
    Flatchatter
    Chat-starter

    An update on this issue – none of the facebook groups can help solve this problem. The various animal and wilderness societies are also not interested in being involved. The Canterbury Bankstown Council maintain they are unable to act because of cat roaming legislation. I have correspondence with all these organisations.

    Can anyone comment on the trespass / nuisance aspect of this behaviour by one inconsiderate resident / owner feeding stray cats on common property and thereby attracting stray cats to the common property?

    #46907
    AvatarAndy
    Flatchatter

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>I don’t see how a resident can be trespassing on common property. How many cats are there now?</p>
    The other night I found a stray dog on the Hume Hwy. I picked it up and took it to an animal shelter. Easy.

    #46909
    AvatarColonel Schultz
    Flatchatter

    Not sure what trespass there is?

    Aside from the bylaw, there are cat deterrents available such as electric fences, sprays and ultrasonic devices.
    <h1></h1>
     

     

     

     

     

    #46926
    Jimmy-TJimmy-T
    Keymaster

    Cat deterrents?  I think they’re called dogs.

    But seriously the problem is the cat feeder.  A well-written and precise by-law, with breaches pursued rigorously,  and a well-positioned security camera, will eventually do the trick in a more humane way.

    #47284
    AvatarPoida
    Flatchatter
    (from NSW)

    We have the same issue in Harris Park. Neighbour in the block opposite feeds a dozen stray cats (many look sickly, some with broken tail) and several unoccupied old houses in this suburb (awaiting knock-down for more flat blocks to come) provide great breeding grounds for each next generation of the poor things.

    Unfortunately he impact of cats is not limited to rats and includes native birds, possums, lizards etc.

    Parramatta Council, like others, are too short-sighted to intervene. A Trap/Neuter/Release program would stop the cycle but they’ll only rent you a trap and have each one killed if you deliver it (bit too extreme for me). I checked a bunch of local organisations but none have got money for TNR anymore.

    PS: I like cats, I’ve got a RSPCA rescued/neutered one but it will never see the outdoors. It’s irresponsible to let them roam and hopefully will be illegal nationwide soon (I think some local governments around the country have already done so?).

    It’s just a sad situation.

    #47321
    AvatarBONNIE L
    Flatchatter

    Hi,  A query re getting rid of a tree due to problem type birds, were other birdlife prevented from visiting this tree? Or perhaps the tree was damaged in an irretrievable way?   Was the local council asked for an opinion?  Some councils have special people specialising in environmental concerns.

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