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  • #7510
    Avatarstruggler
    Flatchatter

    We have a few residents who like to hang their laundry on drying racks in their garages.  This is within their lots.  Though there are sometimes items of laundry hanging from garage doors, which is common property.

    The bylaw referring to laundry reads “an owner or occupier..must not..hang any washing…..in such a way as to be visible from outside building other than on any lines provided by the owners corporation…”

    We are a complex of townhouses.  So does outside the building mean from the driveway?  We all have our own clothes lines so the owners corp doesn't provide any.

    This is where I believe bylaws should have “appendix A” etc to distinguish one strata from another.  Definition of “outside building” would mean one thing for an apartment block, another for this?  Do we take this to mean outside the individual unit or from the street?  Can residents argue that the OC should provide lines that facilitate drying better in the colder weather?

    As I struggled to nagivate through the myriad of clothes drying racks positioned around my unit, I do sympathise with the plight of drying washing in this cold, grey weather with the prospect rising power prices.  I do not, however, wish my home and its surrounds looking similar to a street market in Bali.

Viewing 15 replies - 31 through 45 (of 45 total)
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  • #13304
    Avatarstruggler
    Flatchatter
    Chat-starter

    Just to clarify the washing line situation here further,  owners do have balconies and their own individual washing lines here.  But they don't seem to want to use them.  So this washing is outside my front door.  I don't have to lean over a balcony, I just open my door and bingo there it is.  I wouldn't even mind so much if it was on a washday during the week.  But it is just about everyday.  So I keep my front door shut and my the blinds on front rooms  closed so I don't get flanellettes flapping in my face. 

    I wonder if all these residents do this because if it were on their balconies or clothes lines they would have to look at their washing everyday.  With it in the garage, they don't see it.  But everyone else does.

    I have lived in an apartment previously.  People did put their washing on their balconies.  If I leant over I could see this.  But I could walk out onto my balcony and sit at my table and not see it.  So it was really only there if you looked.  Here, I can't look anywhere without seeing it. 

    #14216
    Avatarstruggler
    Flatchatter
    Chat-starter

    We received this week a letter from the SM stating that drying washing in garages with garage doors open was not allowed.  Someone has complained about this – not me!  Apparently, one of the owners had visitors over who commented on how it was looking like a third world country in this complex.

    I had resorted to shutting blinds and doors and discouraging visitors.  I did show some friends photos of the washing.  Their general reply was “you can't live like that”.  And it was starting to spread through the complex.  We are not talking a drying rack or two, or a line across the garage.  The amount of washing was quite astounding.  It was hanging off the garage door fixtures, off shelves on the wall, on at least four clothes dryers and even lying on the garage door.  And it wasn't one or two days a week but every single day from early until late.  It would have perhaps been tolerable if it was on “wash day” but 7 days a week…..

    Now no one can put their washing in their garage to dry (with the door open).  And it got me thinking.  Previously, before the “laudry” opened across from me, people would occasionally, very occasionally, put their washing in their garage with the door open.  This would only happen with a week of unending rain and a home full of damp clothing.  And really, no one gave this much notice.  It was only when the everyday, all over the place (and going onto common property too) started that shackles were raised.  The actions of a few to the detriment of many.  Isn't it always the way. 

    #14217
    AvatarChopsuey
    Flatchatter

    Has anyone thought of installing a solarventi in their apartment? it might help solve the problem of sticking the washing outside if installed in a bathroom that has an open window.. 

     

    I'm  thinking of installing one in the bathroom so I can get two rooms for the price of one, a washing area and drying room all in one (if strata approves.. problem is I'm not in the top floor).. Don't have to worry about damp towels in the winter or drying washing with the weather forecasted to rain 5 days in a row, rushing home to take in the washing before it rains cats and dogs and then all those hours of sunshine wasted, free warm air in the bathroom keeping the bathroom dry, free of mould and condensation, in the winter when you dry yourself there is constant supply of warm air so you won't get chilled or kiddies get cold.

    You can ditch the dryer and get dry clothes without the clothes falling apart all without effort and electricity..I think it would probably increase the property value since it is maintenance free.

     

    My 2 cents

    #14220
    Jimmy-TJimmy-T
    Keymaster

    For those who are wondering, this is where to find out what a Solarventi is.

    I can think of a dozen reasons why this might not work for strata developments but it could be a goer for townhouses.

    I'd never heard of such a thing before so obviously I'm neither recommending or endorsing it.  Interesting concept, though

    #16323
    Avatarstruggler
    Flatchatter
    Chat-starter

    As I am once again confronted with the sight of washing in my face as I enter/exit my front door, I wonder as to just why someone would want to let all the world see their unmentionables.  Though this at the moment may be a good distraction to anyone to the complex in that they may not notice the disrepair and lack of maintenance.  But I digress…..

    In our complex, a townhouse complex, the issue of washing has a different approach.  In a unit block, I believe that if the washing is kept under the railing on the balcony, then one couldn’t clearly see it from the common areas outside and neighbours could only see if they lean over their balconys in most instances. Here, my neighbours have their garage doors open so not only is their washing visible from the street, but from the front doors and windows of neighbours, and everyone has to drive by/walk by with this display at eye level.  But, if they had any common sense, they could close their garage doors 2/3 of the way.  Then it would not be clearly visible from common property, would not be visible at all from the street and neighbours would have to crouch down on all fours to see into their garage, which I would deem a breach of privacy!  An semi open garage door could be for cross ventilation purposes and it would be sufficient to allow an air flow into the garage and facilitate drying.  And no one would or should know it is washing behind that door.

    Another reason I believe should be considered when washing is clearly available is that it can tell someone outside who and how many live in a place and in some cases where they work or what they do for a living.  And in the case of the wide open garages in this complex, it allows access into the units without contest.  No deadlocks, no exterior quality doors.  Just a little interior door, the kind you have into the “powder room” with a little twist lock.  Anyone could just walk in, and they already have a fair idea of  who lives there by having a look at the washing.  

    So should an EC advise residents that this practice of leaving their garages and therefore their homes open to the public may not be in their best interests let alone the issue of the unsightly washing?  Or do we wait until something happens and the residents say “well someone should have told us not to do that”.

    #16324
    AvatarAnonymous

    Of course the sight of drying washing visible to the street or from common property (or another apartment) either on a balcony or inside, looks downright trailer-trashy and any well-meaning, altruistic notion that it is alright because of the environmentally negative of clothes dryers is… well… it reminds me of the very funny South Park episode called Smug where all the people driving hybrid cars were portrayed as smug and bent over a lot to smell their own expelled wind with satisfied nods.

    It’s OK to use your dryer occasionally and even better to have a clothes horse or two inside somewhere, out of view especially when you’re out. This works well in any well ventilated area that is not in a thoroughfare such as a hall.

    Better that than have your place look like a trailer park and the value of everyones’ investment in real estate goes down, down, down…

    #16327
    Jimmy-TJimmy-T
    Keymaster

    @Juan Durection said:

    Of course the sight of drying washing visible to the street or from common property (or another apartment) either on a balcony or inside, looks downright trailer-trashy and any well-meaning, altruistic notion that it is alright because of the environmentally negative of clothes dryers is… well… it reminds me of the very funny South Park episode called Smug where all the people driving hybrid cars were portrayed as smug and bent over a lot to smell their own expelled wind with satisfied nods.

    “Of course”?  According to Cartman, perhaps.  I’ll see your “smug” and raise it with “snob”.

    #16332
    AvatarAnonymous

    So you don’t agree with my trailer-park theory?

    #16337
    Jimmy-TJimmy-T
    Keymaster

    @Juan Durection said:
    So you don’t agree with my trailer-park theory?

    As I will argue in my upcoming book “Dirty Linen – the Social Significance of Washing Lines”, the way we view laundry drying has changed over the years.  The lines suspended between apartment blocks in New York and Rome, in days gone by, have a romanticism that the beach towels drying over Gold Coast balconies don’t quite possess.  Glasgow Tenement flats had ‘pulleys” that raised the dripping laundry above the kitchen where they would dry, protected from the inclement West of Scotland weather (but not from the chip fat fumes of the nightly fry-up).

    Now, here in Australia, our affordable luxury ceilings are too low for any such contraption so it’s either environmentally destructive and expensive tumble dryers or visually challenging but ecologically right-on (and free) balcony drying.  And far from visible washing being a sign of social disintegration, the balcony by-law breaches are just as likely to be a sign of environmentally aware and socially responsible members of the cappuccino-sipping set as they are to be ‘trailer trash’ who have upgraded to un-wheeled accommodation.

    What I find more upsetting are the bamboo fences that are starting to appear on balconies (especially in the great and growing Gulag on the way to the airport) as residents realise there was a very good reason neighbouring buildings were airbrushed out of the artists impression of the block in which they bought off the plan.

    #13291
    AvatarWhale
    Flatchatter

    I had a similar issue.

    The revised Laundry By-Law as I recall came about because increasing numbers of Strata Plans did not provide clothes lines (e.g. due to a lack of space), and concerns about Metropolitan Sydney (and similar areas) indeed looking like Market St in Bali when residents hung laundered items off balconies to avoid the increased costs of using clothes dryers.

    So with the above in mind and exercising a degree of “reasonableness” the interpretation that the Executive Committee adopted for our Plan is that “laundered items must not obstruct the Common Property, and must not be visible from the streetscape or from any Lot “.

    In your case, that would mean that provided the laundry and drying racks can’t be seen from the street or by other residents from within their homes, and that you and other residents don’t have to “nagivate through the myriad of clothes drying racks” –  it’s OK. 

    #13293
    Jimmy-TJimmy-T
    Keymaster

    I know I'm going to get hammered for this, but it's not as if we're dangling our smalls on bamboo poles off our balconies.  I find the sight of huge buildings that I know house hundreds of tumble dryers more offensive that a few flapping teeshirts.

    Maybe we need to go back to the old days when every unit was allocated a drying day, just to exercise some control.  meanwhile, I reckon washing lines on apartment roofs would probably be a more efficient use of solar and wind power than all these high tech solar cell arrays and windmills.

    #13294

    I believe that many Strata owners are not aware that the change to the by-laws implemented last year was a whole stack of media hype over nothing… The change was only made to the by-law contained in the residential scheme’s model by-laws, which means that your owners corporation would need to change the existing registered by-laws, and if you don’t have registered by-laws, than your scheme is under the schedule 1 by-laws contained in the act, which haven’t changed… So Struggler, if your OC has not changed the by-law at a general meeting and registered the change, than you may be operating under the wrong by-law…

    Now onto the real issue, yes it should be reasonable to expect that you should not have to be dodging individual owners washing lines out on common property to get to your own front door, though tread lightly, as this is still a matter of democratic process… At the end of the day it is down to what the majority of owners find acceptable.

    I always find it a valuable experience to go for a drive through some of those wonderful C suburbs and see how other cultures choose to live, and it makes me appreciate my own home!

    #13296
    Jimmy-TJimmy-T
    Keymaster

    Yes, the whole 'the law has changed” thing was a furphy – but not as much as the “you could go to jail for drying your laundry on your balcony” farce, instigated by a fellow journalist of estimable talent.

    And Mr Strata is right – your by-laws don't change unless you change them, regardless of what the current “model” by-laws are.

    Me, I think I was too influenced by those Italian movies of the 60s.  Every time I see clean white laundry on a balcony, I expect Sophia Loren to appear.

    #13297
    Avatarstruggler
    Flatchatter
    Chat-starter

    Just to clarify, when I said I negotiated a myriad of clothes drying racks around my home, I was referring to all the racks inside of my home.  My meaning being I keep my smalls withing my walls!

    A by product of the clothes drying racks in the garages is that these residents are frequently the ones who place their cars in the visitors car spots.  And my hackles were up after one of these residents, on finding visitors car parks full with actual visitors (including my own)  when they wanted to put their car there so they could put their washing in the garage, then parked their car infront of the visitors cars so they couldn't get out.  The street with ample parking would have been about 20 metres away.

    No one has made an official complaint about the washing walk, though many have commented.  We wonder why one would want to expose their clean clothes to a driveway with frequent cars passing in close proximity.  I'll keep mine inside until the sun shines.

    #13299
    Sir HumphreySir Humphrey
    Strataguru

    In the ACT a Unit Titles Management amendments bill has been presented but not yet enacted. It includes a line that says rules (articles):

    “An amendment to the rules of an owners corporation has no effect to the extent that it results in the rules— … prohibiting or restricting the installation, operation or maintenance of sustainability or utility infrastructure.”

    I think that means we could not put a ban on the installation or use of clotheslines. I think we might get away with restricting installation across the driveway if a favourable location was provided or balcony drying allowed.

    As it happens, in our set of townhouses, we have one person to my knowledge who thinks we should all have electric dryers but the rest of are happy to use this most cost-effective example of solar equipment. 

Viewing 15 replies - 31 through 45 (of 45 total)
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