Flat Chat Forum Common Property Current Page

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  • #52581
    AvatarGuvnor
    Flatchatter

    10 years ago terraces in our small block were retiled by the OC and in recent times effloresence has formed and the OC says it is up to the owners to keep cleaning it off because a report from a consultant said that was the way to fix.

    The same consultant said it was the responsibility of the OC to replace all the failed expansion and periphery seals.

    What we need is someone qualified to tell the OC that it is their problem to fix under s106 of the SSMA. I have had legal advice which pointed me to a company who say they can’t help. Can you?

    i could give a lot more info and have heaps of paperwork.

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  • #52586
    Jimmy-TJimmy-T
    Keymaster

    Efflorescence is caused by the absorption of salt from the sand underneath tiles.  One it has started, you can’t easily stop it and all cleaning does is draw more salt to the surface.  The reason there is too much salt in the sand is because the committee (in this case) used a cheap contractor who didn’t used treated sand (there’s a chemical you can buy) because … guess what … it’s cheaper.  In new buildings, efflorescence is a defect that must be fixed by the developer or builder.

    Given that the committee 10 years ago “saved” money on a cheap job, there is no way they are not liable for fixing this now.  If they say they need an expert opinion, tell them you will take them to NCAT and they can try to find an expert who says it’s not their problem.

    When I complained to my committee about the problem on my balcony, the chairman sent me a long-handled scrubbing brush.  It took a team of proctologists 12 hours to remove it from the pompous ass.

    But seriously, rather than endure the disruption (not to mention the cost) of digging up the tiles and doing the job properly, we allowed the strata committee to seal the existing tiles and lay new ones on top.  It’s a compromise that costs a lot less that a full replacement, is effective and doesn’t require surgery.

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Flat Chat Forum Common Property Current Page